Miscellaneous Writings (1883-1896) by Mary Baker Eddy
Books by Mary Baker Eddy

JUDGE NOT
page 184


JUDGE NOT



   Mistaken views ought to be dissolving views, since
whatever is false should disappear.  To suppose that human
love, guided by the divine Principle, which is Love,
is partial, unmerciful, or unjust, indicates misapprehension
of the divine Principle and its workings in the human
heart.
   A person wrote to me, naming the time of the occurrence,
"I felt the influence of your thought on my mind,
and it produced a wonderful illumination, peace, and
understanding;" but, I had not thought of the writer
at that time.  I knew that this person was doing well,
and my affections involuntarily flow out towards all.
   When will the world cease to judge of causes from a
personal sense of things, conjectural and
misapprehensive!  When thought dwells in God, - and it should not,
to our consciousness, dwell elsewhere, - one must benefit
those who hold a place in one's memory, whether it
be friend or foe, and each share the benefit of that
radiation.  This individual blessedness and blessing comes
not so much from individual as from universal love:  it
emits light because it reflects; and all who are receptive
share this equally.

MISC 291


   Mistaken or transient views are human:  they are not
governed by the Principle of divine Science:  but the
notion that a mind governed by Principle can be forced
into personal channels, affinities, self-interests, or obligations,
is a grave mistake; it dims the true sense of God's
reflection, and darkens the understanding that demonstrates
above personal motives, unworthy aims and
ambitions.
   Too much and too little is attached to me as authority
for other people's thoughts and actions.  A tacit acquiescence
with others' views is often construed as direct
orders, - or at least it so appears in results.  I desire
the equal growth and prosperity of all Christian Scientists,
and the world in general; each and every one has
equal opportunity to be benefited by my thoughts and
writings.  If any are not partakers thereof, this is not
my fault, and is far from my desire; the possible perversion
of Christian Science is the irony of fate, if the
spirit thereof be lacking.  I would part with a blessing
myself to bestow it upon others, but could not deprive
them of it.  False views, however engendered, relative
to the true and unswerving course of a Christian Scientist,
will at length dissolve into thin air.  The dew of heaven
will fall gently on the hearts and lives of all who are found
worthy to suffer for righteousness, - and have taught
the truth which is energizing, refreshing, and consecrating
mankind.
   To station justice and gratitude as sentinels along the
lines of thought, would aid the solution of this problem,
and counteract the influence of envious minds or the misguided
individual who keeps not watch over his emotions
and conclusions.



MISC 292



Next Page

|| - page index - || - chapter index - || - download - || - Exit - ||

 

 

 

 

 (c) Copyright 1998 - Rolf Witzsche
Published by Cygni Communications Ltd. North Vancouver, Canada