Miscellaneous Writings (1883-1896) by Mary Baker Eddy
Books by Mary Baker Eddy

AN ALLEGORY
page 214


betimes burden them with their own.  Despairing of
gaining the summit, loaded as they are, they conclude to
stop and lay down a few of the heavy weights, - but
only to take them up again, more than ever determined
not to part with their baggage.
   All this time the Stranger is pointing the way, showing
them their folly, rebuking their pride, consoling their
afflictions, and helping them on, saying, "He that loseth
his life for my sake, shall find it."
   Obstinately holding themselves back, and sore-footed,
they fall behind and lose sight of their guide; when,
stumbling and grumbling, and fighting each other, they
plunge headlong over the jagged rocks.
   Then he who has no baggage goes back and kindly
binds up their wounds, wipes away the blood stains, and


MISC 328


would help them on; but suddenly the Stranger shouts,
"Let them alone; they must learn from the things they
suffer.  Make thine own way; and if thou strayest, listen
for the mountain-horn, and it will call thee back to the
path that goeth upward."
   Dear reader, dost thou suspect that the valley is humility,
that the mountain is heaven-crowned Christianity,
and the Stranger the ever-present Christ, the spiritual
idea which from the summit of bliss surveys the vale of
the flesh, to burst the bubbles of earth with a breath of
heaven, and acquaint sensual mortals with the mystery
of godliness, - unchanging, unquenchable Love?  Hast
not thou heard this Christ knock at the door of thine own
heart, and closed it against Truth, to "eat and drink
with the drunken"?  Hast thou been driven by suffering
to the foot of the mount, but earth-bound, burdened
by pride, sin, and self, hast thou turned back, stumbled,
and wandered away?  Or hast thou tarried in the habitation
of the senses, pleased and stupefied, until wakened
through the baptism of fire?
   He alone ascends the hill of Christian Science who
follows the Way-shower, the spiritual presence and idea
of God.  Whatever obstructs the way, - causing to
stumble, fall, or faint, those mortals who are striving
to enter the path, - divine Love will remove; and uplift
the fallen and strengthen the weak.  Therefore, give
up thy earth-weights; and observe the apostle's admonition,
"Forgetting those things which are behind, and
reaching forth unto those which are before."  Then,
loving God supremely and thy neighbor as thyself, thou
wilt safely bear thy cross up to the throne of everlasting
glory.



MISC 329



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