(PART 1) - The First Church of Christ, Scientist
Books by Mary Baker Eddy

APPENDIX TO PART I: As Chronicled by the Newspapers
page 593


far more than usual ecclesiastic significance.  The edifice
itself is so rich in the architectural symbolisms of aspiration
and faith, its proportions are so large, and its accommodations
are so wide, that its dedication abounds in
remarkable external manifestations which must arrest
public attention.  But externals constitute the smallest
feature of the Christian Science faith, and this beautiful
temple, striking as are its beauties, is only a slight
and material development in evidence of that beauty and
serenity of faith, life, and love which finds its temple in
the heart of all that increasing host who have found the
truths of Christian Science to be a marvellous revelation
given to this generation by a noble and devoted woman,
to whom they rightfully turn with respect and affection.


rooklyn (N. Y.) Eagle]

   The stoutest enemies of Christian Science will confess
at least an aesthetic debt to that great and growing cult,
which is implied in the building of a great church in


MY 89


Boston. This church is one of the largest and seemliest in
America, and in its size, if not in its aspect, it may be
held to symbolize that faith which is so much a faith
that all facts inhospitable to it are deemed by its professors
not to exist at all.  The building is of light stone,
with a dome over two hundred and twenty feet high, a
chime of bells, and one of the largest organs in the world.
The architect has joined lightness and grace to solidity,
and the edifice needs only an open space about it, such
as one finds in the English cathedrals, to achieve its
extreme of beauty.  A sect that leaves such a monument
has not lived in vain.
   A remarkable thing in this building is that, although
it cost two million dollars, it is not blanketed with debts
and mortgages.  Everything, even to the flagstones in
front of it, is paid for, and subscriptions are not
solicited.  Here is an occasion for joy that marks it as
different from almost all other of the Christian churches,
where petitions for money are almost as constant as
petitions for divine mercy.


enver (Col.) News]

   The dedication of the new Mother Church of the
Christian Scientists in Boston is not a matter of interest
to that city alone, but to the nation; not to the nation
alone, but to the world; not to this time alone, but to
history.
   The growth of this form of religious faith has been one of
the marvels of the last quarter century.  It is, in some
respects, the greatest religious phenomenon of all history.
That a woman should found a religious movement of
international sway; that its followers should number

MY 90


many thousands during her lifetime; that hundreds of
great buildings should be filled at every meeting Sundays
or on week-days with devout worshippers, wooed
by no eloquence of orator or magnetic ritual, - all these
things are new, utterly new, in the history of religious
expression.
   Unaccountable?  Hardly so.  Whatever else it is, this
faith is real and is given very real tests.  Thousands upon
thousands believe that it has cured them of diseases many
and diverse.  All the passionate love for life with which
nature endows the children of men, grips hold of their
faith and insures fidelity in pain or death for self or dear
ones.  But, while health-seeking is the door to this gospel
for many, it is not the only source of appeal.  A faith
which teaches that hate is atheism, that discord is poisonous,
that gloom is sin, has a mission that can be readily
grasped by sick or well.
   The world is enormously richer for this reincarnation of
the old, old gospel of "on earth peace, good will toward

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